Cleft Palate

Cleft Palate is a facial deformity, so rare that most people have never heard of it, occurring 1 in 800 live births.  Some babies are born only cleft lip and others demonstrate more severity that includes the palate.
 
Treating cleft palate involves more than just a plastic surgeon to repair the cosmetic aspects.  Since cleft palate often involves the ear, an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat doctor), audiologist, and speech pathologist are also on the team.  Also involved are an orthodontist, oral and maxillofacial surgeon, general dentist, prosthodontist, neurosurgeon, pediatrician, psychologist, and a social worker.  This is called the "team approach."  These special children need the coordinated talents of many specialists.  Dr. Feldman has been the team orthodontist for the USF craniofacial/cleft palate team since 1984.
 
Dr. Feldman explains what happens with cleft palate.  "The lip and palate (the hard bony plate in the roof of the mouth) fail to differentiate at critical points in the time of the developing child.  Consequently, if differentiation of the tissues that make up these structures is incomplete or abnormal, the union of the lip and palate can be lacking in varying degrees.  The resulting defects may be incomplete, in which only the lip and/or palate is partially involved, or complete, in which both the lip and palate are totally involved.  The cleft can be unilateral (one-sided), or bilateral (occurring on both sides).  Clefts occur more often in boys and normally more on the right side."
 
"The whole idea behind early orthodontic/orthopedic intervention is to move bones back to where they belong," states Dr. Feldman.  "Newborns' bones are more pliable and are easy to move.  Usually bone must be moved before any surgery can take place.  Therefore, many cleft palate children are fitted with orthodontic/orthopedic appliances in the hospital before they are taken home."
 
Neo-natal maxillary orthopedic appliances are used to appropriately align the maxillary bones.  One of them, a Latham appliance (named after the Canadian doctor who invented it), is used to align the premaxilla prior to plastic surgery closure.
 
In order to fabricate an appliance for neo-natal maxillary orthopedics, an impression of the child's palate is taken with an alginate material, which is the same material used in taking dental impressions.  Dr. Feldman then uses this impression to fabricate the appliance that will be inserted onto the palate, in order to move the upper segments together.

What We Offer

  • A FREE orthodontic evaluation which includes a panoramic x-ray, digital images, and consultation with Dr. Feldman valued at $495.00.

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  • The American Association of Orthodontics recommends all children get a check-up with an orthodontic specialist no later than age 7

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  • "invisible braces" and even clear aligners result in braces that are a far cry from the “Ugly Betty” look.

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  • Braces have traditionally been considered mainly for children and teens. Today, more and more adults are aware of the benefits of adult treatment

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  • No more uncomfortable goo creating dental impressions at Feldman Orthodontics we offer digital patient impressions using the latest I-tero technology.

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  • Feldman Orthodontics is now a certified provider of custom Under Armour performance mouthwear!

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  • TMJ / TMD problems include tight muscles, joint inflammation, or teeth grinding.

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  • Cleft Palate is a facial deformity, so rare that most people have never heard of it, occurring 1 in 800 live births.

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  • You may be affected by sleep apnea if you... Are drowsy during the day with no explanation. Snore loudly or wake up breathless at night.

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  • Dr Feldman specializes in "Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics." Many are confused by the "dentofacial orthopedics". We can explain!

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  • Orthognathic Surgery is an adjunct to orthodontic treatment that can help reshape the jaw and jaw position to help improve their form and function.

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  • Craniofacial orthodontics is the sub-specialty of orthodontics focusing on the multidisciplinary treatment of patients with birth defects.

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  • Wearing retainers as instructed is the key to maintaining the success of orthodontic treatment. Patients may be advised to wear retainers full-time for the first six months after “active” treatment ends, with subsequent wear time reduced to night-time onl

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  • Conventional braces alone can take anywhere from a year and a half to four years to properly align and straighten your teeth. AcceleDent® Aura, a take-home orthodontic device, which resembles a sports mouth guard, is shaking things up among orthodontists.

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